First commit.
[u/mrichter/AliRoot.git] / ISAJET / doc / higher.doc
1 \newpage
2 \section{Higher Order Processes\label{HIGHER}}
3
4       Higher order processes can be generated either by the QCD
5 evolution or by supplying partons from an external generator.
6
7       Frequently it is interesting to generate higher-order processes
8 with a particular branching in the QCD evolution or with a particular
9 particle or group of particles being produced from the fragmentation.
10 Examples include
11 \begin{enumerate}
12 \item Branching of jets into heavy quarks (e.g., $g \to b + \bar b$);
13 \item Decay of such a heavy quark into a lepton or neutrino;
14 \item Radiation of a photon, $W$, or $Z$ from a jet.
15 \end{enumerate}
16 It is important to realize that all of the cross sections and the QCD
17 evolution in ISAJET are based on leading-log QCD, so generating such
18 processes does not give the correct higher order QCD cross sections or
19 ``K factors'', even though it may produce better agreement with them in
20 some cases. 
21
22        ISAJET does produce events with particular topologies which
23 in many cases are the most important effect of higher order processes.
24 In the heavy quark example, the lowest order process
25 $$
26 g + g \to Q + \bar Q
27 $$
28 produces back-to-back heavy quark pairs, whereas the splitting process
29 $$      
30 g + g \to g + g, \quad g \to Q + \bar Q
31 $$
32 produces collinear pairs. Such collinear pairs are essential to obtain
33 agreement with experimental data on $b \bar b$ production, and they
34 often are the dominant background for processes of interest.
35
36       Branchings such as the emission of a heavy quark pair, a photon,
37 or a $W^\pm$ or $Z^0$ are rare, and since they may occur at any step
38 in the evolution, one cannot force them to occur. Therefore,
39 generation of such events is very slow. M. Della Negra (UA1) suggested
40 first doing $n_1$ QCD evolutions for each hard scattering and
41 rejecting events without the desired partons, then doing $n_2$
42 fragmentations for each successful evolution. This generates the
43 equivalent of $n_1 n_2$ events for each hard scattering, so the cross
44 section must be divided by $n_1 n_2$. This algorithm can speed up the
45 generation of $g \to b + \bar b$ splitting by a factor of ten for $n_1
46 = n_2 = 10$.
47
48       Since the evolution and fragmentation steps are executed $n_1n_2$
49 times even if good events are found, a single hard scattering can lead
50 to multiple events. This does not change the inclusive cross sections,
51 but it does mean that the fluctuations may be larger than expected.
52 Hence it is important to choose the numbers $n_1$ and $n_2$ carefully.
53
54       The following entities are used in ISAJET for generating events 
55 with multiple evolution and fragmentation:
56
57       \verb|NEVENT|: The number of primary hard scatterings to be
58 generated. Set as usual on the input line with the energy.
59
60        \verb|SIGF|: The cross section for the selected hard
61 scatterings divided by $n_1 \times n_2$. Hence the correct weight is
62 SIGF/NEVENT, just as for normal running. (The cross section printed at
63 the end of a run does not contain this factor.)
64
65        \verb|NEVOLVE|: The number $n_1$ of evolutions per hard
66 scattering. This should never be set unless you supply a REJJET
67 function. Do not confuse this with NOEVOLVE.
68
69        \verb|NHADRON|: The number $n_2$ of fragmentations for a given
70 evolution. This should never be set unless you supply a REJFRG
71 function. Do not confuse this with NOHADRON.
72
73        \verb|REJJET|: A logical function which if true causes the
74 evolution to be rejected. The user must supply one to make the
75 selections which he wants. The default always .FALSE. but includes an
76 example as a comment.
77
78       \verb|REJFRG|: A logical function which if true causes the
79 fragmentation to be rejected. The user must supply one to make the
80 selections which he wants. The default always .FALSE. but includes an
81 example as a comment.
82
83 \noindent Note that one can also use function EDIT to make a final
84 selection of the events. Of course ISAJET must be relinked if EDIT,
85 REJJET or REJFRG is modified.
86
87       At the end of a run, the jet cross section, the cross section for
88 the selected events, and the number and fraction of events selected are
89 printed. The cross section SIGF stored internally is divided by $n_1
90 \times n_2$ so that if the events are used to make histograms, then
91 the correct weight per event is
92 \begin{verbatim}
93       SIGF/NEVENT
94 \end{verbatim}
95 just as for normal events. Of course NEVENT now has a different meaning;
96 it is in general larger than the number of events in the file but might
97 be smaller if NEVOLVE and NHADRON are badly chosen.
98
99       NEVOLVE and NHADRON are set as parameters in the input. One wants
100 to choose them to give better acceptance of the primary hard scatterings
101 but not to give multiple events for one hard scattering. For lepton 
102 production from heavy quarks the values
103 \begin{verbatim}
104 NEVOLVE
105 10/
106 NHADRON
107 10/
108 \end{verbatim}
109 seem appropriate, giving reasonable efficiency. For radiation of photons
110 from jets, NEVOLVE can be somewhat larger but NHADRON should be one, and
111 REJFRG should always return .FALSE., since the selection is just on the
112 parton process, not on the hadronization.
113
114       The loops over evolutions and fragmentations are done inside of
115 subroutine ISAEVT and are always executed the same number of times even
116 though ISAEVT returns after each generated event. Logical flag OK
117 signals a good event, and logical flag DONE signals that the run is
118 finished. If you control the event generation loop yourself, you should
119 make use of these flags as in the following extract from subroutine
120 ISAJET:
121 \begin{verbatim}
122       ILOOP=0
123   101 CONTINUE
124         ILOOP=ILOOP+1
125         CALL ISAEVT(ILOOP,OK,DONE)
126         IF(OK) CALL ISAWEV
127       IF(.NOT.DONE) GO TO 101
128 \end{verbatim}
129 Otherwise you may get the wrong weights.
130
131       It is possible to supply to ISAJET events with partons generated
132 by some other program that may have more accurate matrix elements for
133 higher order processes. Because any such calculation must involve
134 cutoffs ISAJET assumes that the partons were generated imposing some
135 $R$ cutoff, where $R=\sqrt{\phi^2+\eta^2}$, and some $E_t$ cutoff.
136 Given that information ISAJET will generate initial state radiation
137 partons only below the Et cutoff and final state radiation inside the
138 $R$ cutoff. The external partons can be supplied to ISAJET by calls to
139 2 subroutines. To initialize ISAJET for externally supplied partons,
140 use
141 \begin{verbatim}
142       CALL INISAP(CMSE,REACTION,BEAMS,WZ,NDCAYS,DCAYS,ETMIN,RCONE,OK)
143 \end{verbatim}
144 where the inputs are
145
146 \smallskip\noindent
147 \begin{tabular}{lcl}
148       CMSE             &=& center of mass energy\\
149       REACTION         &=& reaction (only TWOJET and DRELLYAN are \\
150                        && implemented so far)\\
151       BEAMS(2)         &=& chose 'P ' or 'AP'\\
152       ETMIN            &=& minimum ET of supplied partons\\
153       RCONE            &=& minimum cone (R) between supplied partons\\
154       WZ               &=& option 'W', 'Z', or ' ' no $W$'s or $Z$'s\\
155       NDCAYS           &=& number of decay options (if 0, assume decay has\\
156                        &&  already been done)\\
157       DCAYS            &=& list of particles W or Z can decay into\\
158 \end{tabular}
159 \smallskip
160
161 \noindent and the output is
162
163 \smallskip\noindent
164 \begin{tabular}{lcl}
165       OK   &=& TRUE if initialization is possible\\
166 \end{tabular}
167 \smallskip
168
169 \noindent Then for each event use
170 \begin{verbatim}
171       CALL IPARTNS(NPRTNS,IDS,PRTNS,IDQ,WEIGHT,WZDK)
172 \end{verbatim}
173 where the inputs are
174
175 \smallskip\noindent
176 \begin{tabular}{lcl}
177        NPRTNS          &=& number of partons, $\le10$\\
178        IDS(NPRTNS)     &=& ids of final partons\\
179        PRTNS(4,NPRTNS) &=& parton 4 vectors\\
180        IDQ(2)          &=& ids of initial partons\\
181        WEIGHT          &=& weight\\
182        WZDK            &=& if true last 2 partons are from W,Z decay\\
183 \end{tabular}
184 \smallskip
185
186       Further QCD radiation is then generated consistent with
187 ETMIN and RCONE, and the partons are fragmented into hadrons as usual.
188 If RCONE is set to a value greater than 1.5 no cone restriction is
189 applied during parton evolution.