Initial commit 4.0.5-3
[usit-rt.git] / lib / RT / I18N / i_default.pm
1 # BEGIN BPS TAGGED BLOCK {{{
2 #
3 # COPYRIGHT:
4 #
5 # This software is Copyright (c) 1996-2012 Best Practical Solutions, LLC
6 #                                          <sales@bestpractical.com>
7 #
8 # (Except where explicitly superseded by other copyright notices)
9 #
10 #
11 # LICENSE:
12 #
13 # This work is made available to you under the terms of Version 2 of
14 # the GNU General Public License. A copy of that license should have
15 # been provided with this software, but in any event can be snarfed
16 # from www.gnu.org.
17 #
18 # This work is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
19 # WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
20 # MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
21 # General Public License for more details.
22 #
23 # You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
24 # along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
25 # Foundation, Inc., 51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA
26 # 02110-1301 or visit their web page on the internet at
27 # http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/gpl-2.0.html.
28 #
29 #
30 # CONTRIBUTION SUBMISSION POLICY:
31 #
32 # (The following paragraph is not intended to limit the rights granted
33 # to you to modify and distribute this software under the terms of
34 # the GNU General Public License and is only of importance to you if
35 # you choose to contribute your changes and enhancements to the
36 # community by submitting them to Best Practical Solutions, LLC.)
37 #
38 # By intentionally submitting any modifications, corrections or
39 # derivatives to this work, or any other work intended for use with
40 # Request Tracker, to Best Practical Solutions, LLC, you confirm that
41 # you are the copyright holder for those contributions and you grant
42 # Best Practical Solutions,  LLC a nonexclusive, worldwide, irrevocable,
43 # royalty-free, perpetual, license to use, copy, create derivative
44 # works based on those contributions, and sublicense and distribute
45 # those contributions and any derivatives thereof.
46 #
47 # END BPS TAGGED BLOCK }}}
48
49 use strict;
50 use warnings;
51
52 package RT::I18N::i_default;
53 use base 'RT::I18N';
54
55 RT::Base->_ImportOverlays();
56
57 1;
58
59 __END__
60
61 This class just zero-derives from the project base class, which
62 is English for this project.  i-default is "English at least".  It
63 wouldn't be a bad idea to make our i-default messages be English
64 plus, say, French -- i-default is meant to /contain/ English, not
65 be /just/ English.  If you have all your English messages in
66 Whatever::en and all your French messages in Whatever::fr, it
67 would be straightforward to define Whatever::i_default's as a subclass
68 of Whatever::en, but for every case where a key gets you a string
69 (as opposed to a coderef) from %Whatever::en::Lexicon and
70 %Whatever::fr::Lexicon, you could make %Whatever::i_default::Lexicon 
71 be the concatenation of them both.  So: "file '[_1]' not found.\n" and
72 "fichier '[_1]' non trouve\n" could make for an
73 %Whatever::i_default::Lexicon entry of
74 "file '[_1]' not found\nfichier '[_1]' non trouve.\n".
75
76 There may be entries, however, where that is undesirable.
77 And in any case, it's not feasable once you have an _AUTO lexicon
78 in the mix, as wo do here.
79
80
81
82 RFC 2277 says: 
83
84 4.5.  Default Language
85
86    When human-readable text must be presented in a context where the
87    sender has no knowledge of the recipient's language preferences (such
88    as login failures or E-mailed warnings, or prior to language
89    negotiation), text SHOULD be presented in Default Language.
90
91    Default Language is assigned the tag "i-default" according to the
92    procedures of RFC 1766. It is not a specific language, but rather
93    identifies the condition where the language preferences of the user
94    cannot be established.
95
96    Messages in Default Language MUST be understandable by an English-
97    speaking person, since English is the language which, worldwide, the
98    greatest number of people will be able to get adequate help in
99    interpreting when working with computers.
100
101    Note that negotiating English is NOT the same as Default Language;
102    Default Language is an emergency measure in otherwise unmanageable
103    situations.
104
105    In many cases, using only English text is reasonable; in some cases,
106    the English text may be augumented by text in other languages.
107
108